The Guardian summarizes the fraught situation:

Rival tanks have been deployed in the streets of Sana'a amid fears of infighting between defecting troops and forces loyal to President Saleh. Three top generals, including Major General Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, have thrown their support behind the protesters, as have several ambassadors. ... An opposition leader says contacts were underway with Saleh over a peaceful way out of the crisis. One option under discussion was for Saleh to step down and make way for a military council until presidential and parliamentary elections are held.

Jane Novak points out:

Ali Mohsen al Ahmar is himself a war criminal and smuggler and many of these defectors are presidential relatives and will have to be politically neutralized, but all Saleh has left from the military are (his son’s commands) the Republican Guard and the Special Forces who are guarding the palace in Sanaa. It is the beginning of the post-Saleh era whether he recognizes it or not.

The latest from AJE:

11:43pm Yemen's defence minister Mohammad Nasser Ali read a statement on state television in Sanaa earlier this evening, saying that the army supports president Ali Abdullah Saleh and will defend him against any "coup against democracy", according to the statement.

11:56pm Sounds of explosions and shooting were briefly heard in an area near a presidential place in Yemen's eastern port of Mukalla, residents say. The nature of the shooting is not clear, but residents say there could have been clashes between pro-government troops and forces loyal to a regional military commander...

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