Elia Isquire looks at neoconservatism's fascist undertones in a different way:

In truth, it seems to me that any argument against neoconservatism as the long-awaited strain of American fascism can only rest on two pillars:

1. As of yet, neoconservatives do not advocate or condone political violence. (They may look the other way or minimize the seriousness of such acts, but that’s a far cry from endorsment.)

2. Similarly, neocons have yet to explicitly argue that election results that are not to their liking are illegitimate and proof that elections themselves have become either hopelessly flawed or for the time being–due to ACORN and New Black Panthers, no doubt–thoroughly corrupt... That’s really it.

Their love of democratization of the Arab world was somewhat abated by the election results in Gaza.

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