RINGAJDABYAArisMessinis:Getty

It's indisputably a huge strategic and psychological victory for the Libyan rebels, and an encouraging sign for the success of Odyssey Dawn so far:

In Ajdabiya, hundreds of cars were seen streaming toward the strategic town, which had been in the control by government forces for almost two weeks. Three large tank transport carriers also headed toward the city. There were reports of pockets of fighting, and heavy damage could be seen in the eastern part of the city as the rebels advanced. “People are celebrating,” said Najib al-Mukasabi, who was driving out of Ajdabiya north toward Benghazi. “The west and east gates are liberated. They’re back in Brega,” he said, referring to the government troops.

Of course, it resolves very little about the end-game. But those concerned that the rebels simply were no match for the Qaddafi machine may breathe a sigh of relief today. And if momentum gathers, Obama could be seen as extremely shrewd both in waiting for the rest of the world to take responsibility for this humanitarian nightmare, and in then swinging American power behind it.

One thing I didn't believe would happen: jets from both Qatar and the UAE have been flying through Libyan airspace.

(Photo: The wedding band is seen on the finger of a dead fighter in leader Moamer Qaddafi's forces as he lies under a blanket in the courtyard of a hospital in the city of Ajdabiya on March 26, 2011, as Libyan rebels seized control of this strategic city marking their first significant victory over Colonel Kadhafi's forces since the launch of the Western-led air strikes a week ago. By Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images.)

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