Charlie Sheen's porn star lover Kacey Jordan tweeted her suicide attempt. Maureen O'Connor psychoanalyzes society:

Kacey wanted someone to "save" her, and in the process, she turned her low point into entertainment. We are no longer gawking at famous entertainers' occasional meltdowns; the meltdowns are the entertainment, and barely any fame is required to participate. Charlie Sheen didn't invent this genre (Dr. Drew preys on it, Tila Tequila clings to it), but he is its most successful practitioner. This is Charlie Sheen's legacy. Not his acting, not his wives and children, not even his meme-generating catchphrases. In the course of a few weeks, Charlie Sheen proved that the most transfixing version of a reality TV show is the one that airs in the real world, live, and amounts to a serialized slapstick snuff film.

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