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Eyal Press surveys opinion among the youth in Israel:

[Y]oung Arabs, who are often portrayed in the Israeli press as implacably hostile to the country’s ideals, support principles such as “mutual respect between all sectors” in higher proportions than their Jewish counterparts (84 versus 75 percent).  ...

“Maybe it’s not a surprise that the minority in any country is very supportive of democratic rights,” says [public opinion analyst] Dahlia Scheindlin. “But it does seem ironic that in the Jewish State, which insists on defining itself as the Jewish democratic state and the only democracy in the Middle East, the Arabs are our most democratic citizens.”

(Photo: A Palestinian boy rides past the Hamas Prime minister Ismail Haniya's destroyed office in Gaza City, on March 25, 2011, as Israeli aircraft attacked four targets in the Gaza Strip during the night, lightly wounding three people, in response to Palestinian rocket attacks on Israel. By Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

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