by Zoe Pollock

Andrew Leonard refutes Mitt Romney's claim that CEOs make for great presidents:

One could even argue that the American CEO has the worst possible preparation for the job of president -- for switching from a job in which there is absolute power to serve a very narrow interest, to a position in which there is extremely limited power, but a mandate to serve the general interest.

Jamelle Bouie sympathizes:

Government service is hard, and even low-profile elected officials have a tough job ahead of them. Underpaid (considering their credentials) and rarely appreciated, they have the mostly unenviable job of writing laws, hashing out legislation, and trying to represent the interests and aspirations of their constituents. Not everyone can do this, and it diminishes lawmakers to tout "business experience" as the only thing you need to successfully run (or participate in) a government.

 

 

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