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by Chris Bodenner

Key updates from the best live-blogs. AJE:

Mohamed ElBaradei, an Egyptian opposition figure, calls on the the army to intervene as pro-Mubarak group continues attack on group that has been protesting in Tahrir Square.

An Al Jazeera correspondent is hearing scattered shots being fired on side streets near Tahrir Square and says "it's a very dangerous and difficult night here as people try to protect their neighborhoods and their families".

Al Jazeera reporting that the Egyptian museum was fire bombed and the army is now trying to put out the fire.

NYT:

CNN is broadcasting live video of the scene outside the Egyptian Museum as one Molotov cocktail after another is being thrown at the opposition protesters in Tahrir Square.

Atlantic:

The Egyptian military is taking its first proactive stance since violent clashes began in Cairo, acting to put out fires that have spread in Tahrir Square from molotov cocktails thrown by government forces from nearby rooftops, reports Al Jazeera Arabic.

Guardian:

US state department spokesman PJ Crowley has infuriated people with his appeal for "all sides in #Egypt to show restraint and avoid violence".

EA:

AFP claims from a witness that organisers paid people 100 Egyptian Pounds ($17) to take part in the pro-Mubarak rallies.

AFP is reporting, from a medic, at least 500 injuries in Tahrir Square today.

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs has told CNN, "We continue to watch the events very closely, and it underscores that the transition needs to begin now."

Watch a live-stream of the square here.

(Photo: Anti-government protestors surround a supporter of President Mubarak after he was beaten in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Yesterday President Hosni Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but would stay in power until elections later this year. Thousands of supporters of Egypt's longtime president and opponents of the regime clashed in Tahrir Square, throwing rocks and fighting with improvised weapons. By Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

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