More and more sane conservatives are beginning to see what Mitch Daniels, David Frum, Conor Friedersdorf and Heather Mac Donald are on about. But this time, it's a popular talk show host, Michael Medved in the WSJ. Money quote:

On his radio show last July 2, the most influential conservative commentator of them all reaffirmed his frequent charge that the president seeks economic suffering "on purpose." Rush Limbaugh explained: "I think we face something we've never faced before in the countryand that is, we're now governed by people who do not like the country." In his view, this hostility to the United States relates to a grudge connected to Mr. Obama's black identity. "There's no question that payback is what this administration is all about, presiding over the decline of the United States of America, and doing so happily."

Regardless of the questionable pop psychology of this analysis, as a political strategy it qualifies as almost perfectly imbecilic. Republicans already face a formidable challenge in convincing a closely divided electorate that the president pursues wrong-headed policies. They will never succeed in arguing that those initiatives have been cunningly and purposefully designed to wound the republic. In Mr. Obama's case, it's particularly unhelpful to focus on alleged bad intentions and rotten character when every survey shows more favorable views of his personality than his policies.

Though they're late in coming, the whispers of complaint against Limbaugh and his ilk are getting louder on the right. Movement writers remain unwilling to condemn him. But the days when his superiors in respectability at places like The Claremont Institute were willing to honor him are far behind. These days, even the number of National Review writers willing to speak in his defense are dwindling, although one doubts that K-Lo will dismantle her shrine any time soon.

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