A reader objected to the spin imposed on events in Egypt. Another reader differs:

As far as starting to write "the narrative:" I think the use of the words "rebirth" or "birth" are fairly apt in the case of the events unfolding in Egypt. When one gives birth to a child, one is consumed with THE event as it occurs (rather hard not to be), but deep down one knows that the real challenge lies in at least the next eighteen years (often more).

The raising of the child--the day to day "nuts and bolts" of the adventure is the real challenge. And how the child will turn out is partly a mystery, as the love and resources might not be enough to change a certain fate, or potential pitfalls the child's parents just can't help the child avoid. How Egypt will "turn out" is up to many forces and unseen events in the future--but we can certainly see evidence of the "people's" aspirations--they and only they can know for certain what it means to love this "child."

"We want a government of the people, by the people" - an Egyptian citizen heard on BBC radio. Surely, this is a "blessed event."

Agreed. This is the end of the beginning. That's all. The rest is up to Egyptians. But if their remarkable poise and nonviolence of the last three weeks are any indicator, the omens are good.

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