Brain-scan-cell-phone-jama
Dave Mosher reports:

Cell phones emit ultra-high-frequency radio waves during calls and data transfers, and some researchers have suspected this radiation albeit inconclusively of being linked to long-term health risks like brain cancer. The new brain-scan-based work, to be published Feb. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, shows radiation emitted from a cell phone’s antenna during a call makes nearby brain tissue use 7 percent more energy.

“We have no idea what this means yet or how it works,” said neuroscientist Nora Volkow of the National Institutes of Health. “But this is the first reliable study showing the brain is activated by exposure to cell phone radio frequencies.”

(Image: "A bottom-of-the-brain view showing average use of radioactive glucose in the brains of 47 subjects exposed to a 50-minute phone call on the right side of their head," - Nora Volkow, JAMA)

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