Today on the Dish, clashes broke out in Egypt, even reporters were attacked, and we followed the chaos here, here, here, here, here, and video here. Steve Negus feared a culture of criminality, Andrew McGregor ran through future scenarios, and Patrick pointed out the Glenn Beck divide. Conor called out Thomas Friedman's nonsense, and deflated the National Review's shoddy logic on the Muslim Brotherhood.

Ambinder picked apart what the US wants, Larison had doubts about Egyptian democracy, and we explored what it meant for oil. Scott Horton considered Mubarak's fear: hate ratio, Graeme Wood offered perspective on Tahrir square, and Shadi Hamid charted the two routes to Arab democracy. Exum explained why the US is so close with Egypt's army, Egypt was more equal than the US, even though wellbeing was declining as its GDP went up, and a blogger explained how not to say stupid stuff about Egypt. Yemen appeared shaky, but Joshua Foust argued it didn't have to do with Egypt.

Conor mourned the fact that controversial blogging and careers don't mix, and annihilated the broken logic of torture advocates. Conor doled out advice for gender conferences, Yglesias seconded Conor on Beck's craziness, and outlawing Sudafed wasn't going to stop meth users. AOL explained how to make money on the web, Conor weighed in on the new governor of the Golden State, Boehner tried to redefine rape, and this is how to look smart. Houses sat empty, cooking could be easy, and a young man stood up for his two mothers.

Interactive global map of unrest here, chart of the day here, MHB here, FOTD here, VFYW here, poignant VFYW observation here, Palin's phrenology here, and Milbank fail here.

--Z.P.

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