Today on the Dish, we chronicled the chaos in Cairo as it unfolded, with more reports of bloodshed here, here, and here. The regime sent texts and thugs to target and harass, assaulted reporters. Graeme Wood praised the Mr. Cleavers of Cairo, and the army appeared to side with Mubarak. The regime accused protesters of being dangerous foreign elements and closed off any other political option, but secular solidarity prevailed. We sought to understand nations in transition, details on the dictator's son, and how the US measures up to Egypt's inequality. Yemen kept heating up, we kept tabs on the US response, and we considered Al Jazeera's coverage if protests spread throughout the Mid-East. Marc Lynch urged the US to send a loud and clear message to the army, and Scott Horton explained exile isn't what it used to be. Gladwell stuck to his guns, despite evidence to the contrary that Twitter did help. Michael Wahid Hanna feared for the Egypt after the cameras stop rolling, Thoreau had hope for democracy, and Gregory Djerejian pleaded for humility.

Conor expanded his attack on Andy McCarthy's sophistry, kept at the Fox's insinuation machine, and calculated traditional health care in a world where we could know when we'd die. One-armed citizens could carry switchblades, libertarians can't get by only on principles, and a high-functioning, meth-using Dish reader enlightened us.

Dissents of the day here and here, creepy ad watch here, chart of the day  here, cool ad watch here, the week in photos here, quote for the day here, FOTD here, VFYW here, and MHB here.

--Z.P.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.