Today on the Dish, we took stock of Egypt. Claudio Gallo sounded a despondent note, Robert Springboard listed businesses owned by the army, and Marc Lynch sized up Obama's options. Mark Thompson identified Washington's pickle, Joshua Foust found Yemen a ripe candidate for revolution, protesters relieved themselves in creative ways, and coffee revolutionized the Middle East. We caught up with Southern Sudan, Richard Posner pinned down why autocratic governments fail, and Iran's Green Movement got involved with Egypt.

Patrick zoomed out on Glenn Beck's spat with Bill Kristol, Goldblog parodied, and Conor pushed back against Frum on Bush's torture arrest. We eulogized the Democratic Leadership Council, Conor would have asked Obama tougher questions than O'Reilly, and Hendrik Hertzberg urged Ron Reagan to run. Our collective heads hit the desk for voters who still think Obama is a Muslim, and Conor considered local governments, reenvisioned Social Security, and picked at public employee unions. Britain banned sex for a low IQ, Conor evaluated teachers, and Serwer skewered Pawlenty on repealing repeal. Profits don't apply to libraries, Huff-Po owned the search engine optimization, and more voices in the blogosphere are better. Christopher Guest made funny, non-P.C. commercials, Tony Comstock blogged for Atlantic, and prostitutes loved Blackberrys. Intelligence wasn't only in the eyes, skyscrapers kept housing affordable, and Pippi Longstocking's house, horse, monkey and gold held many political secrets.

Tweet of the day here, quote for the day here, email of the day here, creepy furniture watch here, app of the day here, MHB here, FOTD here, VFYW here, and VFYW contest #36 here.

--Z.P.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.