Today on the Dish, Chris covered the new face of Tahrir Google exec Wael Ghonim, Derek Vertongen recalled an older Egypt, and Chris collected the dirt on Mubarak's consigliere Suleiman. Reza Aslan wondered if Egypt would reignite Iran's Green Movement, Sumit Ganguly predicted Pakistan wouldn't follow the rush of uprisings, and Eurabia was farther way than assumed. Samer Shehata dissed the dialogue Suleiman had set up, and Tel Aviv was going to miss Mubarak.

Republicans stood up to the Patriot Act, the CIA promoted torturers in their ranks, and Afghanistan was heating up. Conor urged conservative media to let their viewers in on the joke, Reagan wouldn't have had gay marriage as a litmus test for conservatism, and Rumsfeld was Teddy Roosevelt in reverse. Massie outed fake Reaganism, oil peaked early, the market didn't react, and Savage sighed over Iowa's Jim Crow bill for gays. Paywalls could mean HuffPo beating the NYT, sexting in Texas was outlawed, and professional licensing does some harm consumers. Police officers can legally lie to you, humans may not be wired for war, and Conor wasn't going clubbing here. Self-promoting women are looked down upon, all the low-hanging scientific facts have been found, and Will Wilkinson defined the pwn. Great writing doesn't happen on the first try, Nicholas Lemann mastered the observation, and the past beckoned (but not for a memoir). Lovers don't usually marry for the tax break, but some Dish readers do.

Amazing photos from Egypt here, VFYW here, commentary on the contest here, map of the day here, MHB here, blind visual artist here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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