Today on the Dish, we tracked the rumors of Mubarak stepping down and of a military coup, and wrangled the liveblogs when he announced he wasn't. His constitutional reforms meant nothing, and he essentially threw gas on the fire. Graeme Wood put the onus on the protesters to move the uprising past the carnival stage, and protesters played the numbers game, and promised to do it all again if Suleiman took over. HRW revealed truths about the military's relationship to the protesters, Egyptians reiterated this isn't an Islamic uprising, and Eric Trager examined the Muslim Brotherhood's long game. Andrew Mack expressed cautious optimism about the slow march to global peace, Andrew Masloski re-prioritized aid to Egypt, and faces of the fallen circled the Internet. Alan Abramowitz revisited past presidential turnovers, and CIA promotions for torturers could affect more than Panetta's reputation. Protests spread to Iraq, Islamist terrorism fell to .34% of all attacks, and we explored Afghanistan's attitudes toward democracy.

Conor pummeled David Horowitz, sympathized with Rich Lowry's tough predicament, and explored what a normal conservative would learn from NRO on Limbaugh. Chinese gays attended fake marriage markets, US math scores are actually improving, sex in movies went for lust over love, and some divorce for the tax break. Conor nominated one news organization for achieving ideological innovation in online journalism, and Republicans still had it out for Planned Parenthood. Foul grossout material died on the Internet, but inaccuracy and untruths were still very much alive, and Andrew couldn't believe he missed a revolution.

VFYW here, Sully bait here, FOTD here, Yglesias award here, dissents of the day here, and protest sign of the day here.

--Z.P.

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