Today on the Dish, we tracked Libya's tenth day of protests, from early morning all the way to tonight, while Qaddafi's own soldiers refused to kill their fellow Libyans. Alexis charted Libya's plummeting oil production, and Abigail Hauslohner confirmed Facebook's central role in their revolution. Tribal structure mattered in Libya, Larison considered the US citizens trapped there, and we examined the list of Qaddafi's dwindling allies. A reader translated a French doctor's account of the mounting carnage in Libya, while another reader gave a deep read to Bahrain's constitution. Andrew kept an eye on the Saudis, Ahmadinejad threw stones while sitting in his glass house, and Iranian television sounded eerily similar to Glenn Beck.

Obama decided to no longer defend DOMA. Ambinder translated what that means, while some prepared for Y2Gay. The full web reax is here.

Walker got pranked, lost Clive Crook, and maintained his "campaign promises" despite facts to the contrary. Nate Silver sifted the Wisconsin polls, Ozimek stood by his stance on unions by citing education reform, and Wilkinson added his voice on what he called the left's Tea Party. Andrew bashed the House Republican budget, John Yoo flashed his chutzpah, Rumsfeld revealed Bush's plans for Iran and was a little too honest about why we went to Afghanistan. Andrew got his Palin fix, she denied her fake Facebook account, but readers pointed to the cunning way she handled it. We weighed Mitch Daniels' merits, Jason Kuznicki linked freedom and spending, China needed water to succeed. Police dogs aimed to please their owners, Andy McCarthy duked it out with Sanchez some more on the Patriot Act, and Seattle Times favored legalization. Crime shows are politically purple, Sarah McLachlan knew how to ruin your day, and bees don't need warrants to search your house.

Quote for the day here, tweet of the day here, dissent of the day here, Tucson relapse watch here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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