Today on the Dish, Andrew picked apart Obama's marriage decision. Linda Hirshman saw a trap for Republicans, Jonathan Turley said it was still up to the Supreme Court, and Fox News reported blatant untruths about the decision's implications. Ilya Somi questioned what Obama has to defend, Jason Mazzone called it a gamble, and David Link narrowed it back to the question on Section 3. Civil unions arrived in Hawaii, and Timothy Kincaid envisioned what happens if Congress doesn't defend DOMA.

We took a step back to get perspective on the Arab 1848 and how long it's been brewing; day 11's full recap and analysis is here. Qaddafi went off the deep end (by phone), Drudge swallowed his poison, and some predicted the end is nigh. Beinart questioned the conservative's ability to accept democracy in the Middle East, Robert Fisk reported on the quiet in Tripoli, and Libya's effect rippled through the oil markets. The American public wanted the US to leave Arab countries alone, and we dug up the right's reactions to Bush's second inaugural speech and its call tyranny in the world. John Bohannon examined whether war is irrational, and Exum wondered who was really in charge. Americans lobbyists represented Qaddafi, EA caught up with Egypt, Santorum defended the Crusades, and Tom Friedman mixed his metaphors. 

We debated whether state workers are underpaid or overpaid, but closed the case on whether breaking teacher's unions aids education. Josh Sides compared unions and state debt, Rhodes Cook looked to Wisconsin's influence on 2012, and Weigel read the mood on the Kochs from Wisconsin. Reihan said Walker is just like any other politician fawning after celebrities and donors, Abe Lincoln once fled, and another insane attorney-general staffer bit the dust.  The US got served in the cannabis research race, North Korean kids didn't weigh up  to their South Korean counterparts, and robot journalists waved from the horizon.

Charts of the day here and here, experiment in beardage here, Palin crack here, Yglesias award here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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