Today on the Dish, we shared some exciting home news and readers reacted. Andrew debated fear versus hope in the Arab 1848, and investigated how Bush's torture regime could have contributed to the uprisings. The wave reached Oman, Tehran tightened its grip, and another prime minister bit the dust in Tunisia. Edward Rees explored Libyan logistics for a no-fly zone, James Traub explored Qaddafi's former appeal, and the right lumped together all Muslims. Egyptians queued up for simple things like a bus, and hit a bump in the sectarian road.

Andrew established new rules for Boner (Boehner) and Cock (Koch), and Chait tested the Kochs' libertarian commitments.  Will Wilkinson connected the Tea Party to leftist protests in Wisconsin, and Nate Silver calculated their political power. Hertzberg traced Wisconsin's fault lines, Reagan appreciated a compromise, and evangelicals looked down on debt as a sin. Christians needed to accept the normalization of gay marriage, Boehner promised a DOMA decision this week, and David Link unraveled Newt's take on Obama's gameplan. Doug Mataconis celebrated the condoms, the ACLU defended the Ten Commandments, A. Barton Hinkle made the liberal case for property rights, and Calculated Risk summed up the jobs we've lost. The NYT changed with the times, gender gaps plagued journalism, and Rumsfeld condescended to Condi.  GPS stopped kids from playing hooky, sidewalk rage helped society, and nuns had suffrage before many women. Facebook captivated the world, one man converted to a beard devotee, and some dogs are dumber than other dogs.

Chart of the day here, quote for the day here, Malkin award here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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