Footage said to be from the shooting in Manama:

Enduring America:

As his security forces were shooting protesters, Bahrain's Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa was saying on state TV, "It is now the duty of every Sunni and Shia to calm things down for the sake of the country."

The Guardian:

Lots of tweets flying around about medical treatment being denied in Manama. Reports unconfirmed as yet.

The BBC:

The BBC's Nick Springate in Manama says the main hospital there is in "complete chaos". He says more than 2,000 people are outside chanting against the government. He adds that medics say about 120 people have been admitted, mostly suffering from tear gas or with broken bones, and there is one person who has a gunshot wound to the leg.

The Lede:

As my colleague James Glanz reports, Bahrain's government has apparently made an effort to prevent bloggers and eyewitnesses from posting evidence of the security crackdown online. Still, some video of the funerals was posted on the video-sharing site Bambuser, which allows users to stream live video to the Web from their phones, earlier on Friday. Later in the day, the entire Bambuser site was blocked inside Bahrain, according to the Bahrain Center for Human Rights.

Notice how obsessed the authorities are about Bambuser, bloggers, social media, video images, and the like. Notice how important it appears to the protestors to film these atrocities on their cell-phones. Have they not read Malcolm Gladwell? These are all irrelevant. And yet, somehow, to the people actually fighting for freedom, they are central.

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