Greg Sargent notices something interesting in the PPP poll showing how unhinged GOP primary voters are on the question of Obama's very legitimacy as president: among non-Birthers, Sarah Palin has a favorable/unfavorable rating of 41 - 52. Among Birthers, it's a whoppingly favorable 83 - 12, far higher than anyone else. Here's Greg's interpretation:

It seems fair to speculate that the success of Palin's approach -- her grievance-mongering, her strident attacks on Obama, her virtuosity in crafting the most lurid formulations to paint Obama as an alternately weak and tyrannical figure -- is rooted in her unique ability to speak directly to the far right wing base's seething underbelly of anti-Obama hatred.

She is the base's base, and her appeal, in my view, is all about identity politics.

She represents no real coherent set of ideas; merely what she would call the "real America", i.e. white and rural. I also think race is at play here. I think many people under-estimated the willingness of Americans to vote for a black president before his election, but equally under-estimated the impact of an actual black president after his Inaugural actually doing things and exercizing authority. I see Palin as a kind of cultural antibody to the future America Obama represents. And if the next election focuses on culture and not economics - or culture because of economic stagnation - I would not count her out.

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