by Zoe Pollock

Jack Shenker reports from Cairo:

At night in Tahrir Square, the central plaza which demonstrators have been occupying for several days, Cairenes pool together money to buy food and drink, offer each other blankets, and pass round working phones in an attempt to circumvent the government’s communications blockade. ...

By tonight the Arab World’s most populous nation could have a new leader at the helm. But even if it doesn’t something fundamental and strong has been unearthed from Egyptian society this week – and regardless of political machinations at the top, few on the ground are likely to forget it.

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