TAHRIR OBAMA

by Chris Bodenner

Michael Scherer spells out the tough spot the Obama administration finds itself in:

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced [Thursday] afternoon, "The Egyptian government must demonstrate its willingness to ensure journalists' ability to report on these events to the people of Egypt and to the world." But she stopped short of explicitly condemning the official Egyptian role in the crackdown, and she went on to urge opposition groups to sit down with Vice President Suleiman, as Suleiman has demanded.

From the beginning of this crisis, the Obama Administration has tried to stay a half-step ahead of events in Egypt, not wanting to be seen as dictating any outcomes in the internal struggles of an ally. As a result, the Obama Administration has appeared, more often than not, to always be falling a little behind the curve, reacting to the last outrage even as a new one unfolds. If violence sparks again on Friday night, as many expect, and the government causes more bloodshed, we can expect more outrageous condemnations by the White House officials. But will those words will be enough to preserve for the president the role he seeks on the world stage, as a leader [and Nobel winner] promoting democracy and human rights?

(Photo via Enduring America)

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