According to a blogger Malia Litman's account of a phone interview with a spokesman for the Anchorage Police Department, the APD has admirably corrected its initial statement to the National Enquirer regarding this unconfirmed story. Money quote from Litman:

"Officer Parker confirmed that the Officer Billiet was the officer who had spoken with William Fortier when the initial call was made regarding possible prostitution activities.  Dave Parker did not know about Officer Billiet’s involvement or his tip from William Fortier.  Thus Dave Parker confirmed that he did not have all the information when he prepared the press release for the National Enquirer. 

Officer Parker confirmed that no attempt was made by him, and to his knowledge, by anyone with the Anchorage Police Department, to check the computer records or cell phone records of either Kashawn Thomas or Shailey Tripp.  Thus he confirmed that the names of many people could be on the computer or cell phones seized, but he would not know about that. 

Thus if Todd Palin’s name appeared on the cell phone or lap top of Shailey Tripp, Officer Parker was not in a position to confirm or deny that.  He did say that 'rabid' anti-Palin people might try to 'conjure' something up.  He did confirm that the cell phones and computer would be returned when both cases are closed, and that there would be no reason for any phone numbers or names to have been deleted.

In conclusion, the Press Release issued by the Anchorage Police Dept was inaccurate and misleading.

The 'evidence' seized, and 'examined' by the APD did include cell phones and computers, but they were not examined to determine if the name of Todd Palin appeared on them. There was a call placed to the Anchorage Police Department that ultimately led to the arrest of Shailey Tripp and Kashawn Thomas. Officer Parker just didn’t have all the information available at the time he prepared and issued the press release to the National Enquirer."

The original and now retracted statement from the APD allegedly came after one of Palin's lawyers allegedly called to ask them to deny allegations in the NE piece. So far, the National Enquirer's reporting holds up. But the police investigation will presumably get to the bottom of this. But it's unfortunate they first responded with inaccuracies.

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