In a piece subtitled, "The Islamic agenda is not coexistence, but dominion," Andy McCarthy again raises the spectre of a global caliphate governed by sharia law, writes as if all Muslims are coherently lumped into a single caliphate-seeking entity, and does everything short of explicitly calling for a war on Islam to thwart them. Various commenters at NRO capably flagged the flaws in his piece. Hal Morris:

Mr. McCarthy's sweeping generalities apply to only some parts of the Muslim world, and the more we address the Muslim world as if they are all the enemy of the west, the more they will be driven to unite and really be at total war with the rest.

And here's Quayle:

One and a half billion Muslims in the world and Andrew McCarthy knows what every last one of them is thinking, and it ain’t good. So he indicts not just the bad actors merely claiming Muslim legitimacy, but he indicts the entire Muslim religion as well – the religion cherished by over a billion peaceful children of our mutual Father in Heaven. And this is pure hypocrisy from McCarthy, and regrettably mirrors the same hypocrisy on this point of much of western (predominantly, American) Christianity. We western Christians spent the better part of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries killing each other by the millions in inter-Christian war after war. Yet we easily brush that aside as underived from and unrelated to our Christian religion because we claim such wars weren’t “religious wars.”

...we hypocritically don't allow modern Muslims that same privilege even when their bad actors have killed only in the thousands. We don’t allow Muslims to use the same argument that we use, which is that the violent among them are the heretics of the religion, and not exemplars of the religion. Rather, at the first sign of an advocate of violence we readily paint Muslims and their religion with one, huge, broad brush, during and after which we wax self-congratulatory about our noble Christian heritage, bloody though it clearly was.

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