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A few days ago, the Assyrian International News Agency reported that Egyptian armed forces attacked a monastery outside of Cairo, wounding two monks and other Coptic workers. Terry Mattingly bemoans the dearth of media coverage:

It is crucial, at this stage, to realize that there have been high-profile demonstrations in recent weeks in which many Muslims and Copts have stood together in calling for reform and for peace and cooperation between the vast majority of the nation that is Muslim and the 10 percent of the population that is Coptic, as well as members of Egypt’s other minority religions.

As always, however, it’s crucial to remember that there is no one Islam in this scene, including in the leadership of the nation’s army. That is a fact that is worthy of news coverage.

(Photo: Egyptian Coptic Christians hold a cross high during a joint communal gathering of anti-government protesters in Cairo's Tahrir square on February 06, 2011. By Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

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