After visiting Venice Beach, California, Reihan reflects on the browning of America:

History tells us that our familiar ethnocultural distinctions will eventually break down. Just as Americans of Irish and Italian and Jewish origin were once considered seditious and unassimilable aliens by native-born Protestants of northern European stock, one gets the strong impression that intermarriage will melt seemingly unmeltable ethnic groups. Asian-Americans, once victims of intense persecution, have by and large been embraced by the larger culture. Perhaps the most vivid illustration of this phenomenon is the fact that a large majority of Japanese-Americans born in the 1980s and 1990s have one non-Japanese parent, usually of European origin.

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