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Jeff Jarvis broadens the debate on the revolution in social media:

After Mubarak left, [Google's Wael] Ghonim said on CNN that he wanted to meet Mark Zuckerberg to thank him for Facebook and the ability to make that page. After the Reformation in Europe, Martin Luther thanked Johannes Gutenberg. Printing, he said, was "God's highest and extremest act of grace." Good revolutionaries thank their tools and toolmakers. ...

In the privileged West, we have been talking about net neutrality as a question of whether we can watch movies well. In the Middle East, net neutrality has a much more profund meaning: as a human right to connect. When Mubarak shut down the internet, when China shuts down Facebook, when Turkey shuts down YouTube, when America concocts its own kill switch, they violate the human rights of their citizens as much as if they burned the products of Gutenberg's press.

(Photo from July 2010, when "bloggers Photoshopped a picture of Mark Zuckerberg to show him holding up a sign that read, "Sayeb Sala7, ya 3ammar," the slogan for a freedom of expression campaign late in 2010.")

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