by Zoe Pollock

Rod Dreher interviewed senior researcher Brian J. Grim about The Future of the Global Muslim Population, the latest report from the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life:

The report shows, for example, that in Tunisia, where the current wave of unrest began, the median age is 29 years five years above the average for Muslim-majority countries. In comparison, the median age in Egypt is 24, and in Yemen it’s 18 six years below the average for Muslim-majority countries. ... Interestingly, the unrest began in the older, relatively richer country where the middle class is also relatively larger and then it spread to the younger, relatively less well-off countries.

Grim also goes into detail about the rise of Muslim populations in Europe and in the United States:

In the United Kingdom, for example, Muslims are expected to comprise 8.2 percent of the population in 2030, up from an estimated 4.6 percent today. In Austria, Muslims are projected to reach 9.3 percent of the population in 2030, up from 5.7 percent today; in Sweden, 9.9 percent (up from 4.9 percent today); in Belgium, 10.2 percent (up from 6.0 percent today); and in France, 10.3 pecent (up from 7.5 percent today).

In the United States, Muslims make up a much smaller share of the total population. But we project that if current trends continue, Muslims will comprise 1.7 percent of the U.S. population in 2030, which is approximately the same portion that Episcopalians, Jews or Mormons represent today.

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