A reader writes:

The biggest issue in dispute is not collective bargaining but the provisions of the legislation which end payroll deduction of union dues from public employees’ paychecks by the state, and a new requirement that unions be recertified by employee vote annually – and requiring that the vote be by a majority of all workers, and not just workers casting ballots. When New York passed legislation ending automatic payroll deductions for a particular teachers’ bargaining unit a few years ago, that union saw its dues revenue decline by 35%.

When the union workers had to write checks to the union themselves for their dues, rather than the “painless” process of simply never seeing the money in their bank accounts, they suddenly were more reluctant to part with their own money. This “dues pump” is little more than the transfer of union member money into state politician political coffers – Democratic politician political coffers – and the GOP controlled legislature and governor in Wisconsin are perfectly justified in ending it. If the union’s efforts are so valued by the union members, they’ll pay their dues, and the Dems can continue to suck on that teet for campaign funds.

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