by Zoe Pollock

Jeremy Bernstein examines ElBaradei's history as the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency:

If [ElBaradei] is part of a new government that emerges, one hopes that his attitude towards nuclear proliferation will not change, though the Muslim Brotherhoodwhich is known to be hostile to Israel and which has in recent years called for Egypt to acquire a nuclear deterrentcould put new pressure on the government to pursue a bomb. No one knows how this will turn out but of one thing we can be grateful: unlike in Pakistan, which faces instability of its own and has apparently doubled the number of its nuclear weapons to about a hundred, there aren’t any nuclear weapons in Egypt that might fall into the wrong hands.

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