by Zoe Pollock

Michelle Goldberg explains why “The No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act," or H.R. 3, scares her:

[H.R. 3] demonstrates a startling new extremism in the GOP. In the past, even the most resolutely antiabortion Republicans usually made exceptions for rape and for life-threatening medical emergencies. H.R. 3 is the product of a House willing to jettison even those minor protections for women.

Sady Doyle argues the bill redefines rape, by the terms "an act of forcible rape or, if a minor, an act of incest":

Studies of how rapists find and subdue victims reveal that about 70 percent of rapes wouldn't fall under the "forcible" designation.

Which leaves us with those rapes that could be construed as "forcible." Except that this clause doesn't guarantee an exemption for them, either. The term "forcible rape" actually has no set meaning; legal definitions of "force" vary widely. And every survivor who finds herself in need of abortion funding will have to submit her rape for government approval.

Amy Sullivan investigated what it takes to get reimbursed by Medicaid for an abortion, and just how few actually are.

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