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Wendell Steavenson reports on the mood in Cairo:

The army remains on the streets in some numbers. It has dissolved parliament and suspended the constitution, and every day the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces issues communiques assuring its commitment to democracy and the legitimacy of the people, without putting a time frame on a transition or including any civilians in their interim administration. Perhaps it is just wishful thinking, but most Egyptians do not seem overly worried. For now, the tenet of the revolutionthat the army and the people were one handis holding.

Yesterday, I sat with an old friend of mine, a doctor, in his apartment overlooking the Nile, and he couldn’t stop smiling. “It feels different,” he kept saying. “We are full of relief and disbelief.”

(Photo: An Egyptian couple looks at the remains of the ruling National Democratic Party headquarters that was burnt during the popular revolt that drove veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak from power after 30 years. By Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Getty Images)

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