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Elissa Lerner reviews David Axe’s new graphic novel “War is Boring: Bored Stiff, Scared to Death in the World’s Worst War Zones,” with art by Matt Bors:

The tragedy of Axe’s book is not the actual tragedy of war, nor his boredom with it. It’s his boredom with himself and the rest of humanity, and for this reason his account should be read by budding war reporters, so that they might safeguard themselves against developing his outlook. Axe does offer a bit of wisdom at the end, but it is cold comfort. “The more of the world I see, the less sense it makes,” he writes:

The more different people I meet, the less I believe in their humanity. The older I get, the less comfortable I am in my own skin….the things we can believe in shrink into a space smaller than our own bodies. To preserve them, for as long as you might, arm yourself, and be afraid.

(Photo: The X-ray scan of a wounded anti-regime demonstrator shows a bullet lodged in his brain while he is nursed at the intensive care unit at a hospital in the eastern city of Tobruk on February 25, 2011. By Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

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