"What has kept me relatively sane in the matter is that I try to focus the conversation on things we can agree on. I talk about the need for separation of church and state, the importance of teaching kids to question their beliefs and seek out their own answers (Christians, of course, think this will lead them toward faith), the lack of politicians who represent our constituency, why we need to keep forced religion out of public schools, the myriad cases of discrimination against atheists, etc. I talk about the need for them to take those ideas back to their churches and pastors. They have a hard time saying no to those ideas above. So that’s where I keep my focus. It’s more important to me that Christians get on board with those ideas than whether they believe in a god or not." - Hemant Mehta, Friendly Atheist.

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