"I note that some Palin fans are trying to spin the fact that she never called on the president to produce his birth certificate or questioned his citizenship. They are missing the point. Sarah Palin has said that these questions are legitimate, that voters have a right to know, and that “a lot” of citizens are concerned about it.

She didn’t say what any rational person on the right or left believes: that questions about the president’s birth have been settled by the state of Hawaii, that only a very small group of citizens are even concerned about the issue, and that an equally small number of people were even aware of the ridiculous controversy over Trig’s origins...

The problem is, unless the GOP and that includes Rush Limbaugh and the other cotton candy conservatives who wield a lot of influence stand up and denounce her in no uncertain terms, birtherism will have gone completely mainstream in the Republican Party. If that happens, you might want to forget about any significant gains at the polls for the GOP in 2010," - Rick Moran, PJM.

There will be and can be no GOP base or even elite open dissent against Palin.

She is a religious icon now. In a religious party. Logic has no place in such a climate; just obedience, and, er, that wonderful word from the campaign: deference.

Needless to say, I'll post at length on this shortly. But I am grateful that Palin herself has now said that the attempt to get independent factual evidence of factual claims made by politicians as a central part of their campaign appeal and platform is legitimate. Of course it's legitimate. It's called journalism and accountability.

But as we have discovered, those two elements are no longer very common among journalists and politicians. They are all infotainers now.

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