A reader writes:

I think you may need to withdraw that nomination.  Morrissey explained in an addendum what he's really getting at:

"Bybee and the OLC were asked what interrogators could do within the law, and instead the OLC reverse-engineered a legal opinion to allow them to violate it. I understand why they did, but it still violated the statute...If we foresee a need to work outside the law, then change the law to make sure it covers those situations."

If I'm reading him correctly, Morrissey doesn't object to torturing prisoners at all.  He just doesn't like the tortured legal reasoning in the Bybee memo.  He thinks we should openly legalize torture, loud and proud.  Maybe that's less hypocritical than some of the other torture supporters.  But surely it doesn't deserve an award--unless you also want to nominate Lavrentii Beria.

At this point, even a tiny shard of intellectual honesty on the right in defense of torture is worth celebrating.

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