by Patrick Appel

Contrary to persistent rumors, a new statement:

Claims are circulating, citing Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya, that the Egyptian military has issued a statement saying it recognises protesters' demands as "legitimate" and it will not shoot upon protesters.

The Guardian warns:

As always it's worth taking this sort of news with a large pinch of salt. And wait and see what actually happens.

Along the same lines, Max Fisher relays Ashraf Khalil's worries:

Even on Friday evening, when army tanks first deployed in the streets of Cairo, there were already scattered signs of friction. That night, I witnessed protesters openly berating and shoving soldiers -- who once again showed impressive patience. A few protesters behaved so aggressively toward the soldiers, without achieving a reaction, that I could only conclude the soldiers were under direct orders not to retaliate. But the longer the military is deployed in the streets, surrounded by hothead protesters, the greater the chances of the situation spiraling out of control. 

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