by Chris Bodenner

Jeff Stein searches for the best guess:

[L]ongtime observers of the region are putting their money on Gen. Omar Suleiman, the powerful chief of Egyptian intelligence. In office since 1993, Suleiman has reportedly been grating at Mubarak’s plan to install his son Gamal as his successor. With protests roiling Cairo, he may now see his moment has come. [UPDATE: Mubarak appointed Suleiman vice president on Saturday, Egyptian state television reported.] An open question is whether he can count on help from his longtime friends in the CIA.

Al Jazeera makes a troubling observation:

Ayman Mohyeldin reports how the new Mubarak appointees Shafiq and Suleiman have strong military credentials - suggesting slight departure from the previous economic-oriented cabinet to one that is more security-oriented.

More from Mackey:

On Twitter, Mr. Wedeman also pointed to another blogger's note that Mr. Suleiman negotiated directly with the C.I.A. on the rendition of terrorism suspects, according to "The Dark Side," Jane Mayer's book on the Bush administration's war on terror.

Ian Black, The Guardian's Middle East editor, has added a short profile of Mr. Suleiman to the newspaper's live blog on Saturday's events.

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