In the most idiotic criticism of Barack Obama since Laura Ingraham denounced him for putting mustard on his hamburger – yes, really – shamless hack CNN commentator Erick Erickson excoriates the president for announcing a moment of silence for victims of the Arizona tragedy:

I feel the need to make a political point here about why this President is getting bashed for his “moment of silence” when other Presidents, from Carter to Reagan to Bush to Clinton to Bush, did not. He recently made people mad by quoting the Declaration of Independence and leaving out the bit about the Creator. During his inaugural address he mentioned atheists and subsequently proclaimed us not a Christian nation.

In yesterday’s “moment of silence” he wanted prayer or reflection. Here’s the problem when conservatives push for school prayer and advocate for a “National Day of Prayer,” they include “or reflection” to get around namby-pamby atheist objectors.

But the left uses it too. The left uses it to accommodate atheists.

President Obama’s statement stands out because it is just another verbal telling that he’s ideologically of the left. He already has problems with a public perception of him and his faith. That things like this keep coming up suggests the general public is right in their skepticism of the sincerity of his faith.

What does Doug Mataconis find offensive about that?

 ...the clear implication in Erickson’s propaganda disguised as commentary that there is something wrong with a government official taking into account the fact that not all of his constituents share his religious beliefs, or those of the majority of the country. He doesn’t explain exactly what’s wrong with this, although considering the audience he’s writing for at Red State, I guess he doesn’t really have to because that’s clearly a universe where non-Christians are suspect to begin with and atheists are only one level above Muslims in their version of Dante’s Inferno, maybe even a level below Muslims. However, that isn’t the universe we live in, and Erickson obviously needs an education in the First Amendment and America’s long tradition of freedom of thought when it comes to religion.

This is the problem that Social Conservatives have when it comes to religion. They want the government to reflect their beliefs, but they have zero respect for the beliefs, or non-beliefs, of others. To borrow a phrase that they are always eager to throw around, that’s just un-American.

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