Today on the Dish, Patrick rounded up the SOTU reax, including the three words most NPR listeners heard, while Nate Silver put Obama's power in perspective. Conor illuminated the real state of the union and obliterated the perfunctory SOTU editorials, while Douthat bemoaned the lack of specifics on the deficit. Alex Balk comforted us about the state of our stomachs, and Kevin Featherly ogled Bachmann's pupils.

Chris tracked events on the ground in Egypt, including the status of Facebook/ Twitter, and the day's craziest pictures and video. Blake Hounshell critiqued the WaPo for critiquing Obama's response, and Marc Lynch remained humble but optimistic, along with Steven Cook. Stephen Walt stood by his earlier assessment about Tunisia's domino effect, and Conor prickled at the blatant profit-scheme of the military-industrial complex. The US lost more troops to suicide than combat, but gaming helped them cope. Jennifer Rubin refused to apologize for calling Steve Clemons an Israel-basher, and Conor wondered if ending hotel porn would increase escort calls. Belgium pranked its phone company, and terrorists were punished.

Conor fought back against Hugh Hewitt's insistence that the right is a victim, but he wasn't any easier on Olbermann's bazooka style rhetoric. Frum blamed Fox News for the lack of 2012 candidates, Conor begged Bill Kristol to break a story about the GOP's inner sanctum, rather than just complaining about it, and he dared Ailes to hire Glenn Greenwald. Conor reiterated the Dish's policy on airing dissents, and the Internet still wanted the President to answer questions about our drug policy. We heard the flipside to animal testing, Noah Millman rebutted a Dish reader on the three-fifths compromise. Readers also weighed in on evolutionary psychology and rape, Obamacare, and Conor luxuriated in Huckabee's "folksy Old Testament wrath."

Walter Murch tested the science of 3D and found our evolution lacking, but Dish readers proved him wrong. E.G. found the shame of states bigger than just a joke, studying declined, and Apple (and Girl Talk) changed how we listened to albums. The DEA sold rubber duckies, America shuddered at eating soy, and weed went the way of Walmart.

Headline for the day here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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