Josh Marshall signals it for the Labor party in Israel, which essentially founded the country and led it for its first thirty years. Today Ehud Barak, former Prime Minister and current head of Labor, has left Labor to form a new party:

If you're an Israeli who wants to vote for a potential governing party which is at least in principle in favor of a two-state solution, Kadima seems like your obvious choice. If you want a more clearly left pro-peace process party, you'll probably want to vote for Meretz, another party with historic ties to the Labor tradition in the country. Somewhat like the British Labour party, Labor has institutional ties to the Israeli labor movement which may help keep it afloat as a political party. But in the current situation, why you would vote for Labor for reasons behind its historic legacy or habit is not clear.

Evelyn Gordon calls it a revolution.

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