by Chris Bodenner

Mackey has more on the military's presence:

[Al-Masry Al-Youm, an independent Egyptian newspaper] posted a photograph showing Egyptian Army vehicles in central Cairo and explained why that might be a welcome sight to protesters:

Three army vehicles carrying dozens of soldiers drove down Qasr al-Nil Bridge early Friday evening. They were seen heading toward the headquarters of Egyptian State TV on Corniche al-Nil. The area also houses the ruling National Democratic Party headquarters and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The Egyptian Army were previously twice deployed in Cairo in 1977 during bread riots and in 1986 to quell police riots. During the last six decades, the army has never fired on Egyptian civilians.

Meanwhile:

Army tanks are rolling into the centre of Cairo and Suez, al-Jazeera reports. Mubarak has supposedly ordered them in to restore order but people have been cheering the army hoping it will side with them against the police.

Why the tanks might have been called in:

Al Jazeera is showing images of a fire consuming part of the headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party in Cairo.

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