Mac McClelland reports on rape in Haiti,  where "a survey taken before the earthquake estimated that there were more than 50 rapes a day just in Port-au-Prince." Now an organization founded by women who were raped "says that displacement camps are hornet's nests of sexual violence":

When Alina happened upon a group of mentoo many to countraping a girl in the squalid Port-au-Prince camp where she and other quake victims lived, she couldn't just stand there. Maybe it was because she has three daughters of her own; maybe it was some altruistic instinct. And the 58-year-old was successful, in a way, in that when she tried to intervene, the men decided to rape her instead, hitting her ribs with a gun, threatening to shoot her, firing shots in the air to keep other people from getting ideas of making trouble as they kept her on the ground and forced themselves inside her until she felt something tear, as they saw that she was bleeding and decided to go on, and on, and on. When it was over, Alina lay on the ground hemorrhaging and aching, alone. The men were gone, but no one dared to help her for fear of being killed.

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