Yglesias thinks not:

If the President goes and leads the charge for tax reform, what happens is that tax reform passing becomes “a victory for the White House” and we start getting stories about “President Obama’s goal of overhauling the tax code.” And a proposal like that will be dead on arrival. Fundamental tax reform has a chance if and only if there’s a bipartisan group of hardworking members of the House and Senate who sincerely want to reach consensus on a tax reform proposal.

So why on earth shouldn't the president try and get this started? I think Matt is seriously wrong here - and my own personal test for the seriousness of this presidency from here on out is its commitment to long-term fiscal balance and tax reform. Readers know I am sadly underwhelmed by the sincerity of the GOP on the debt. I don't believe they are serious, although I want to. But if they prove their intent in a manner that actually risks unpopularity - as the Tories have done in Britain - they will get no more enthusiastic supporter than yours truly.

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