The delicacy with which this is put actually cracked me up. Yeah, it's JPod, that icon of rhetorical restraint:

Sarah Palin has become a very important person in the United States. Important people have to speak with great care, because their words matter more than the words of other people. If they are careless, if they are sloppy, if they are lazy about finding the right tone and setting it and holding it, they will cease, after a time, to be important people, because without the discipline necessary to modulate their words, those words will lose their power to do anything but offer a momentary thrill either pleasurable or infuriating. And then they will just pass on into the ether.

If she doesn’t serious herself up, Palin is on the direct path to irrelevancy. She won’t be the second Ronald Reagan; she’ll be the Republican incarnation of Jesse Jackson.

Does JPod realize that the Dish made that analogy a long, long time ago? Back when he was touting the new Esther?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.