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by Chris Bodenner

Breaking:

Mr. Mubarak finished his address by saying that he intends to ask the government to resign and will presumably appoint new ministers to run the country. He showed no sign of relenting or resigning himself.

Soon after Mr. Mubarak's address ended, CNN reported loud shouts of protesters on the streets outside their office who appeared to be heading in the direction of the information ministry.

Update: More of his speech from EA:

2226 GMT: Mubarak says incidents of last few days have left "majority" of Egyptians "fearful". He will "shoulder first responsibility" to protect security and will not "let fear grip" citizens and "halt our future".

2225 GMT: Mubarak appealing to his sacrifice in service of Egypt and its citizens. Then he returns to promises of steps to deal with unemployment and low income.

2224 GMT: Mubarak linking economic progress to order and calls on people to resist "plots" that lead to looting and violence.

2220 GMT: Mubarak says he realises "aspirations" of Egyptian people to fight unemployment, poverty, and corruption. He recognises their suffering, but progress cannot come through violence.

Update II:

2229 GMT: Al Jazeera's Ayman Mohyeldin says protesters outside his office in Cairo have resumed chanting, "Down, down, down with Mubarak".

Update III: The Lede:

A live feed of the scene on the street outside CNN's office in central Cairo shows protesters chanting slogans in defiance of the curfew. Frederik Pleitgen, a CNN correspondent in the Egyptian capital, reports that the police are nowhere to be seen and the Egyptian military is apparently not making any attempt to enforce the curfew, just protecting nearby government buildings, like the ministry of information, state television and the national museum.

Mr. Pleitgen also reports that the people on the streets include parents with their children and are not neatly fitting into the profile assigned to them by Mr. Mubarak, of violent thugs bent on destruction.

(Screenshot via soupsoup)

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