Mark Thompson fisks torture enthusiast Marc Thiessen's soccer-is-socialism nonsense. A reader writes:

Soccer really has very few rules compared to other sports. There are no regulations on how the players can be aligned, the clock doesn't stop once the game starts, etc.  It sounds like a conservative's paradise to me.  Football - which I assume Thiessen believes is more "American" - has an incredible array of rules and regulations.  There are rules about where the offensive players can line up before the play starts; defenders aren't allowed to touch receivers more than five yards from the line of scrimmage; defensive players can't hit an defenseless player, etc.  There are even regulations on what number you can have, how you wear your socks and the league office is constantly tweaking the rules to favor one side of the ball over the other.  And they even punish players for off-the-field actions that are unpleasant but not against the law.  I don't know how a conservative could love such a tightly regulated sport.

Another writes:

Funny, our PBS station aired the “Shadow Ball” episode of Ken Burns’ Baseball last night it opened with the following:

"It is a community activity. You need all nine people helping one another. I love bunt plays. I love the idea of the bunt. I love the idea of the sacrifice. Even the word is good. Giving yourself up for the good of the whole. That's Jeremiah. That's thousands of years of wisdom. You find your own good in the good of the whole. You find your own individual fulfillment in the success of the community the Bible tried to do that and didn't teach you. Baseball did," - Mario Cuomo.

Another:

Thiessen's post might be a ripoff of the great Chuck Klosterman's take on soccer, excerpted here. (Of course, if you know his work, Chuck meant to be light-hearted, whereas I'm sure that idiot Thiessen means it.)

Another:

I know you have a very low opinion if Marc as a columnist/reporter, but I detect a very strong tongue-in-cheek from Marc on this one.

Another:

Can we just pretend he doesn't exist?

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