Alex Massie pushes back against liberals who complain about its supposed lack of democratic legitimacy:

Before there could be unum there had to be pluribus. The states, by definition, are the constituent components and once you think of the country as a bottom-up rather than top-down entity then the iniquities of equal representation in one half of Congress ceases to seem quite so dreadful and become instead entirely reasonable. And for good reason. There's an argument, in any case and in any country, for checking the principle legislature and since small states and their interests can easily be overlooked in the House of Representatives it's useful that they be given greater voice in the upper chamber, even if this means they themselves may sometimes exert undue influence.

Viewed from that perspective, it's not at all unreasonable for Wyoming to have the same representation as California... Majorities  - that is big countries or populous states - enjoy great advantages anyway and their interests are most unlikely to be overlooked or even thwarted all that often. But offering smaller players some greater measure of protection is a useful compromise even if it dents the purity of the democratic ideal.

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