Howard Gleckman focuses on the ACA's most unpopular provision - the healthcare mandate:

In some ways, the mandate represents the worst of all policy worlds. Americans hate it because they can’t stand the idea of being made to get coverage or pay a tax. On the other hand, the initial levy is so lowonly $95-a-yearit isn’t much of an incentive to buy insurance. The penalty is supposed to gradually increase to as much as $695 or 2.5 percent of taxable income, but Congress could well bow to the inevitable pressure to block the –let’s all say it together– “job-killing health tax increase.”  

In this environment, both pols and policy analysts are looking for more palatableand possibly more effective– alternatives to the mandate. And there may be some.

He proceeds to list them.

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