It's hard to argue with them here:

Torture and conspiracy to commit torture are felonies under U.S. law. Yet the United States has failed to hold accountable those who authorized and perpetrated torture against prisoners in U.S. custody. 

Brookings Institute scholar Ben Wittes defends the president:

One of the more courageous things the Obama administration has done is to generally decline to engage in retroactive investigation of the last administration on matters of interrogation policy. The lingo is “looking forward, not backwards,” and it has greatly frustrated the left. 

And Glenn Greenwald shows that defense to be nonsense:

[C]an someone please tell me what a "retroactive investigation" is?  Are there any other kinds?  I don't believe it's possible to investigate or prosecute acts that occur in the future.  This railing against "retroactive investigations" is nothing more than a deceitful Orwellian concoction by Beltway propagandists to justify why elites -- but nobody else -- are shielded from accountability for their acts.

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